Great Egret

Great Egret is otherwise known as The Great White Egret, Common Egret or Large Egret. Often seen as the one pictured below, standing on one leg only. The bird has a notable kink of its neck, curving it into an “S” shape when flying. Although we don’t see many land around Footsteps we know when […]

Great Cormorant

The Great Cormorant is also a great fisherman. Often seen by locals as a major competitor for fish because not only are they great fishermen but also can eat as much as they catch. This big bird can stay underwater circa half a minute and dive to over five metres. Found just ten minutes from […]

Caspian Tern

Caspian Tern | Its name comes from the Latin and, like the name suggests refers to the Caspian Sea. The Caspian Tern is one of the species to which the Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds (AEWA) applies. Their global population is approximately 50,000 pairs. While their numbers in most regions are stable, the Baltic Sea […]

Scimitarbill

The Scimitarbill is indeed a bird and not an invoice for mechanical repairs on a sports car. It should also not be confused with a backsword or sabre with a curved blade although I believe this is where its name originates because of its beak! It is among three species of Scimitarbill all of which are […]

Blue-bellied Roller

This is one of my favourites, the Blue-bellied Roller is such a beautiful bird and easy to see not only because of its striking colours but also because of its size. Seen at Footsteps regularly and on the walk to the beach this fella will definitely make an appearance. Where there is one you will […]

Senegal coucal

Senegal coucal is a member of the cuckoo species. Found as the name suggests in Senegal but also in much of central and Southern Africa. A daily visitor to Footsteps and not shy so any old camera will get a great close-up shot. Pictures below are by lil ol me! I can’t help being reminded […]

Heuglin’s Masked-weaver

Heuglin’s Masked-weaver hardly rolls off the tongue does it! There are many kinds of Weaverbird. Most are fairly unextraordinary in their looks but some such as The Northern Red-bishop are extraordinary in theirs. Weavers are so-named because of the way they weave their nests from leaf fibres like a basket. They can leave Palm-trees shredded […]

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